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When I was a journalist in Montana, I wrote stories about endangered species — grizzly bears, wolves, eagles. Now my concern is about another endangered species — journalists.

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It would be foolish to compare today with the devastation wrought by the plague of the 14th century. What today we call the “black death.” Most of the destruction happened within a few years, but it recurred for at least another five decades after that. It took England 150 years to regain it…

“And all that dwell upon the earth shall worship him, whose names are not written in the book of life of the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” — Revelation 13: 8

The first thing to remember about vice presidential picks is that they are marketing decisions. That is, once a candidate has been deemed qualified to be president, the only thing that matters is what the choice says about the person at the top of the ticket.

Leftists who dominate Jefferson County Public Schools’ Board of Education desire a huge tax increase amidst a health pandemic wreaking sudden destruction on a once-roaring economy, locking down the commonwealth and throwing thousands out of work and into the realm of uncertainty about how th…

In a sense, it’s pointless to debate whether the United States should have a more hawkish policy toward China, because we’ll have one regardless of how the 2020 elections go. There’s a broad consensus among both of the political parties and foreign policy experts across the ideological spect…

editor's pick

While Congress has rightfully provided relief for families and businesses affected by a government-induced economic shutdown, now is the time to focus on reopening the economy and getting back to a normal way of life.

Eighty-seven years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Abraham Lincoln delivered perhaps the most famous speech in American History. In its text is the ironic line, “the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here.”

Future historians of the American right are going to have a devil of a time figuring out what the hell happened as the second decade of the 21st century came to a close. But every day I become more convinced about at least one of their conclusions: The nationalists blew it.

An economic crisis such as the one dragging behind this quarantine like a heavy, unbreakable chain squeezes an entire state, revealing or magnifying the true condition of its economy along with the competency — or lack thereof — of its political leadership.

One of the things I love about America — and there are many — is her deeply ingrained rebelliousness. When the government tells us to do something, we instinctively question it.

Like in other states, Kentucky’s governor has ordered childcare providers to close their doors in response to the coronavirus. Unfortunately, that left essential personnel including health care professionals, law enforcement officers and grocery store workers with few options for their children.

Gov. Andy Beshear missed a golden opportunity to demonstrate that he’s personally walking the COVID-19 walk as well as talking the talk concerning the need for Kentuckians to hunker down at home and the commonwealth to shut down its economy with the exception of what he deems “essential” services.

The future is particularly murky these days. It’s anybody’s guess how the pandemic, the presidential election and the economy are going to play out. Just about the only thing that’s assured is that U.S. relations with China will never be the same.

Our nation was founded on the unique principle that individuals acting in their own self-interest would overcome the greatest of challenges while keeping government power in check.

Our nation was founded on the unique principle that individuals acting in their own self-interest would overcome the greatest of challenges while keeping government power in check.

WASHINGTON — Before the pandemic, President Trump seemed poised for reelection. Now, with the economy in lockdown and record numbers of Americans filing for unemployment, Republicans are increasingly worried that the pandemic could cost them the White House.

On the one hand, everyone needs to do their part and take care of themselves. On the other hand, everyone needs to look after their neighbor and take care of each other. Both of these statements are perfectly true, but if one is taken on its own without the other life would become unbalanced…

editor's pick

Newspapers in the United States have traveled rough seas to the First Amendment freedoms we enjoy today. From the colonial Stamp Act through wartime censorship to today, when thousands of newspapers were slammed with the public health emergency known as COVID-19, people who work for newspape…

It’s not only what the legislature does but doesn’t do which greatly impacts multitudes of Kentuckians and their families.

The Covid 19 shutdown

First and foremost, I want to let everyone know that Caldwell Medical Center is here for our community. These are uncertain times with a lot of unknowns, but you can gain some peace of mind with the knowledge that we are taking the COVID-19 outbreak very seriously and aggressively working to…

One of my favorite quotes is by Admiral Bill McRaven: “We will all find ourselves neck deep in mud someday. This is the time to sing loudly, to smile broadly, to lift up those around you and give them hope that tomorrow will be a better day.”

editor's pick

We were in session Tuesday and will possibly be in session Wednesday to consider overriding bills Gov. Andy Beshear has vetoed and possibly pass a few more bills. So far, the governor has vetoed five bills. After today, we won’t go back in session until January 2021 unless the governor calls…

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) delivered the following remarks April 9 on the Senate floor regarding the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act:

I just got off the phone with a pastor friend in Eastern Kentucky who shared some sad and disappointing news.

A quasi-government group’s response to Gov. Andy Beshear’s signature of legislation creating a separate board for the County Employees Retirement System (CERS) — which covers local government workers and classified school personnel — illustrates the wrong-headed mindset at the heart of all o…

I’ve been telecommuting for decades, so for me sheltering in place isn’t remotely the burden it is for a lot of Americans. But it does make the job of following politics more difficult for two reasons.

The Kentucky constitution requires the General Assembly to meet at the capitol in even numbered years to adopt budgets for the commonwealth, and we are meeting our constitutionally required obligation. Because of the coronavirus that is effecting all of our lives, the General Assembly only m…

COVID-19’s spread, which doesn’t stop for anyone or anything — including for legislators’ constitutional duty to pass a budget determining how state revenues will be spent — is forcing a very different spending plan than the one envisioned by many when this General Assembly session began.

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, families, businesses and health care providers are facing unprecedented tough times. However, during these trying times I’m encouraged to see the strength exemplified by communities across the nation to support each other and heed warnings.

We’re reminded during COVID-19 that the beauty of this un-commonwealth isn’t limited to its majestic mountains, picturesque horse farms and flowing rivers.

If you're interested in submitting a Letter to the Editor, click here.

“And all that dwell upon the earth shall worship him, whose names are not written in the book of life of the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” — Revelation 13: 8

The first thing to remember about vice presidential picks is that they are marketing decisions. That is, once a candidate has been deemed qualified to be president, the only thing that matters is what the choice says about the person at the top of the ticket.

Leftists who dominate Jefferson County Public Schools’ Board of Education desire a huge tax increase amidst a health pandemic wreaking sudden destruction on a once-roaring economy, locking down the commonwealth and throwing thousands out of work and into the realm of uncertainty about how th…

In a sense, it’s pointless to debate whether the United States should have a more hawkish policy toward China, because we’ll have one regardless of how the 2020 elections go. There’s a broad consensus among both of the political parties and foreign policy experts across the ideological spect…

editor's pick

While Congress has rightfully provided relief for families and businesses affected by a government-induced economic shutdown, now is the time to focus on reopening the economy and getting back to a normal way of life.

Eighty-seven years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Abraham Lincoln delivered perhaps the most famous speech in American History. In its text is the ironic line, “the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here.”

Future historians of the American right are going to have a devil of a time figuring out what the hell happened as the second decade of the 21st century came to a close. But every day I become more convinced about at least one of their conclusions: The nationalists blew it.

An economic crisis such as the one dragging behind this quarantine like a heavy, unbreakable chain squeezes an entire state, revealing or magnifying the true condition of its economy along with the competency — or lack thereof — of its political leadership.

One of the things I love about America — and there are many — is her deeply ingrained rebelliousness. When the government tells us to do something, we instinctively question it.

Like in other states, Kentucky’s governor has ordered childcare providers to close their doors in response to the coronavirus. Unfortunately, that left essential personnel including health care professionals, law enforcement officers and grocery store workers with few options for their children.

Gov. Andy Beshear missed a golden opportunity to demonstrate that he’s personally walking the COVID-19 walk as well as talking the talk concerning the need for Kentuckians to hunker down at home and the commonwealth to shut down its economy with the exception of what he deems “essential” services.

The future is particularly murky these days. It’s anybody’s guess how the pandemic, the presidential election and the economy are going to play out. Just about the only thing that’s assured is that U.S. relations with China will never be the same.

Our nation was founded on the unique principle that individuals acting in their own self-interest would overcome the greatest of challenges while keeping government power in check.

Our nation was founded on the unique principle that individuals acting in their own self-interest would overcome the greatest of challenges while keeping government power in check.

WASHINGTON — Before the pandemic, President Trump seemed poised for reelection. Now, with the economy in lockdown and record numbers of Americans filing for unemployment, Republicans are increasingly worried that the pandemic could cost them the White House.

On the one hand, everyone needs to do their part and take care of themselves. On the other hand, everyone needs to look after their neighbor and take care of each other. Both of these statements are perfectly true, but if one is taken on its own without the other life would become unbalanced…

editor's pick

Newspapers in the United States have traveled rough seas to the First Amendment freedoms we enjoy today. From the colonial Stamp Act through wartime censorship to today, when thousands of newspapers were slammed with the public health emergency known as COVID-19, people who work for newspape…

It’s not only what the legislature does but doesn’t do which greatly impacts multitudes of Kentuckians and their families.

The Covid 19 shutdown

First and foremost, I want to let everyone know that Caldwell Medical Center is here for our community. These are uncertain times with a lot of unknowns, but you can gain some peace of mind with the knowledge that we are taking the COVID-19 outbreak very seriously and aggressively working to…

One of my favorite quotes is by Admiral Bill McRaven: “We will all find ourselves neck deep in mud someday. This is the time to sing loudly, to smile broadly, to lift up those around you and give them hope that tomorrow will be a better day.”

editor's pick

We were in session Tuesday and will possibly be in session Wednesday to consider overriding bills Gov. Andy Beshear has vetoed and possibly pass a few more bills. So far, the governor has vetoed five bills. After today, we won’t go back in session until January 2021 unless the governor calls…

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) delivered the following remarks April 9 on the Senate floor regarding the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act:

I just got off the phone with a pastor friend in Eastern Kentucky who shared some sad and disappointing news.

A quasi-government group’s response to Gov. Andy Beshear’s signature of legislation creating a separate board for the County Employees Retirement System (CERS) — which covers local government workers and classified school personnel — illustrates the wrong-headed mindset at the heart of all o…

I’ve been telecommuting for decades, so for me sheltering in place isn’t remotely the burden it is for a lot of Americans. But it does make the job of following politics more difficult for two reasons.

The Kentucky constitution requires the General Assembly to meet at the capitol in even numbered years to adopt budgets for the commonwealth, and we are meeting our constitutionally required obligation. Because of the coronavirus that is effecting all of our lives, the General Assembly only m…

COVID-19’s spread, which doesn’t stop for anyone or anything — including for legislators’ constitutional duty to pass a budget determining how state revenues will be spent — is forcing a very different spending plan than the one envisioned by many when this General Assembly session began.

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, families, businesses and health care providers are facing unprecedented tough times. However, during these trying times I’m encouraged to see the strength exemplified by communities across the nation to support each other and heed warnings.

We’re reminded during COVID-19 that the beauty of this un-commonwealth isn’t limited to its majestic mountains, picturesque horse farms and flowing rivers.

It was a strange week at the Capitol, much as it was all over Kentucky and the rest of the U.S. Almost empty committee rooms during hearings, half the staff working remotely, cafeteria closed except for carry out, but the General Assembly still in session.

Life has posed plenty of unexpected occurrences during my 71 years on this earth. But at this point, none seems to compare to the upheaval this world has seen with the novel coronavirus.

It is important to approach the current coronavirus pandemic with equal measures of prudence and hope. Practical solutions to stop the spread of a novel disease are not new. They have worked in the past, and they do not need to lead to fear or panic.

If COVID-19 previously was a distant concern to anyone, the events of the past week most certainly pushed this new respiratory virus to the forefront of a life-altering reality.